Friday, May 24, 2019

This is East Texas, and there’s lines. Lines you cross, lines you don’t cross. That clear?”


New London, Texas. 1937. Naomi Vargas and Wash Fuller know about the lines in East Texas as well as anyone. They know the signs that mark them.

“No Negroes, Mexicans, or dogs.”

They know the people who enforce them.

“They all decided they’d ride out in their sheets and pay Blue a visit.”

But sometimes the attraction between two people is so powerful it breaks through even the most entrenched color lines. And the consequences can be explosive.

“More than grief, more than anger, there is a need. Someone to blame. Someone to make pay.”

Ashley Hope Pérez takes the facts of the 1937 New London school explosion—the worst school disaster in American history—as a backdrop for a riveting novel about segregation, love, family, and the forces that destroy people

Friday, April 5, 2019

We Are Displaced by Malala Yousafzai


Nobel Peace Prize-winner Malala Yousafzai will start with her own story of displacement as an Internally Displaced Person to show what it means to lose your home, your community, and the only world you've ever known. She will also share the personal stories of some of the girls she has met on her various journeys to refugee camps and the cities where refugee girls and their families have settled.

In a time of immigration crises, war, and border conflicts, We Are Displaced is a reminder from one of the world's most famous people who experienced displacement that everyone deserves universal human rights and a home.







Sunday, February 10, 2019

Jane Goodall’s Lovely Letter to Children About How Reading Shaped Her Life



BriainPickings has a great blog post about the wonders of reading.  Mary Oliver's quote really resonates with me "We read to remember. We read to forget. We read to make ourselves and remake ourselves and save ourselves. “I read the way a person might swim, to save his or her life,”

That life-steering power of books 
is what pioneering primatologist 
Jane Goodall articulates with great simplicity and sweetness in her contribution to 
A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader (public library) — a labor of love eight years in the making, comprising 121 illustrated letters to children about how books form and transform us by some of the most inspiring humans in our world: artists, writers, scientists, philosophers, entrepreneurs, musicians, and adventurers whose character has been shaped by a life of reading.

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Educated by Tara Westover



Here's our next Lunch Book Bunch pick! Highly recommended by Bill Gates.
Just started it and it's fascinating!

An unforgettable memoir in the tradition of The Glass Castle about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart

This is one of the many novels that I enjoyed over summer break-great plot twist...

Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her. 


A girl who refuses to be the person she once was.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018


Summer is the perfect time 
to catch up on reading!

Check out the Book Concierge  for a guide to great reads!

Orphan Train by Christina Baker





Really enjoyed this novel based on true accounts of children being rounded up fro NYC streets and sent o trains to the Midwest to be adopted by families needing free labor.

The author of Bird in Hand and The Way Life Should Be delivers her most ambitious and powerful novel to date: a captivating story of two very different women who build an unexpected friendship: a 91-year-old woman with a hidden past as an orphan-train rider and the teenage girl whose own troubled adolescence leads her to seek answers to questions no one has ever thought to ask.